August 30, 2013
madcatinc:

8x12 Digital Print
MelissaAnneDesigns.etsy.com

madcatinc:

8x12 Digital Print

MelissaAnneDesigns.etsy.com

August 30, 2013
madcatinc:

8x12 Digital Art Print
MelissaAnneDesigns.etsy.com

madcatinc:

8x12 Digital Art Print

MelissaAnneDesigns.etsy.com

August 30, 2013
madcatinc:

10x10 Photo Print
MelissaAnneDesigns.etsy.com

This lady has one of my favorite etsy shops. She’s always adding something new, so I try to reblog her posts to help her get some views/purchases. I figure it’s good karma right?  

madcatinc:

10x10 Photo Print

MelissaAnneDesigns.etsy.com

This lady has one of my favorite etsy shops. She’s always adding something new, so I try to reblog her posts to help her get some views/purchases. I figure it’s good karma right?  

August 30, 2013

I title this post “Please to Esplain!” AKA somebody please provide me with an explanation as to why any of these exist!!!! That child looks legitimately terrified! 

August 30, 2013
Abstract Images Of Earth From High Above

By William Sawalich

NASA isn’t the only game in town when it comes to amazing images from outer space. Don’t forget about the European Space Agency, which has a pretty amazing archive of its own (there’s a link below). The blog awkwardly titled but always interesting blog, "But Does It Float" has curated an awesome gallery not just of any old images from space, but of our amazingly beautiful earth. These images are often abstract, and always interesting, including views of everything from Africa’s Namib desert to the geometric abstraction of Peru’s Andes foothills. It’s a beautiful, colorful, fascinating collection—exactly what I want to see our space explorers working hard to bring back to us here on earth.


Photographs of Earth from the ESA Archive
Title: Walt Whitman



The icy waters of the Baltic Sea surrounding Germany’s largest island, Rügen, JAXA/ESA




A phytoplankton bloom swirls a figure-of-8 in the South Atlantic Ocean about 600 km east of the Falkland Islands. Different types and quantities of phytoplankton exhibit different colours, such as the blues and greens in this image, ESA




The landscape of the Tanezrouft Basin, one of the most desolate parts of the Sahara desert, in south-central Algeria. The region is known as ‘land of terror’ because of its lack of water and vegetation, JAXA/ESA




The southern Atacama Desert, with the border of Chile (west) and Argentina (east) running down the middle. The Atacama is believed to be the driest desert in the world, and the lack of cloud cover in this image highlights the dry climate, ESA




Beijing, NASA/ESA




Clearwater Lakes, located to the east of the Hudson Bay, what appears to be two separate lakes is actually a single body of water that fills two depressions. The depressions were created by two meteorite impacts, believed to have hit Earth simultaneously up to 290 million years ago, USGS/ESA




The northern part of the country of Namibia. Namibia is located on the west coast of southern Africa between Angola and South Africa, ESA




Lake Powell, USGS/ESA




In this false-color image of the Mississippi River delta, land vegetation appears pink, while the sediment in the surrounding waters are bright blue and green, USGS/ESA




The sand seas of the Namib Desert, KARI/ESA




The Paraná River cuts through this image of southern Brazil, ESA




The northern end of the Persian Gulf, along with the border of Iran and Iraq and the mouth of the Shatt al-Arab river, USGS/ESA




Sand and dust blowing northeast from the Arabian Peninsula across the Persian Gulf toward Iran (visible at image top), ESA




The foothills of the Andes mountains near the southern coast of Peru, KARI/ESA




Sand and dust from the Sahara Desert blowing across the Atlantic Ocean along the coasts of Mauritania (top), Senegal (middle) and Guinea Bissau (bottom), ESA




North central Siberia, ESA




Three of the five Great Lakes of North America. Lakes Huron (left) and Erie (bottom) are partially ice-covered following snow storms in Michigan and Cleveland, while Lake Ontario (right) is completely visible in blue, ESA




Running across the image, the Okavango River forms the border between Namibia to the south and Angola to the north, KARI/ESA




Rolling hills of farmland in part of the Palouse Region in the northwest United States, KARI/ESA




(Source: dpmag.com)

1:40pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/Z9vZptthaAjG
  
Filed under: art photography earth space 
August 30, 2013
Financial stress may hit your brain and wallet

Fuck off Brian Wang, AP wrote this first, AND a million times better/less offensive. Ever think about maybe changing careers? 


WASHINGTON (AP) — Being short on cash may make you a bit slower in the brain, a new study suggests.

People worrying about having enough money to pay their bills tend to lose temporarily the equivalent of 13 IQ points, scientists found when they gave intelligence tests to shoppers at a New Jersey mall and farmers in India.

The idea is that financial stress monopolizes thinking, making other calculations slower and more difficult, sort of like the effects of going without sleep for a night.

And this money-and-brain crunch applies, albeit to a smaller degree, to about 100 million Americans who face financial squeezes, say the team of economists and psychologists who wrote the study published in Friday’s issue of the journal Science.

"Our paper isn’t about poverty. It’s about people struggling to make ends meet," said Sendhil Mullainathan, a Harvard economist and study co-author. "When we think about people who are financially stressed, we think they are short on money, but the truth is they are also short on cognitive capacity."

If you are always thinking about overdue bills, a mortgage or rent, or college loans, it takes away from your focus on other things. So being late on loans could end up costing you both interest points and IQ points, Mullainathan said.

The study used tests that studied various aspects of thinking including a traditional IQ test, getting the 13 IQ point drop, said study co-author Jiaying Zhao, a professor of psychology and sustainability at the University of British Columbia.

The scientists looked at the effects of finances on the brain both in the lab and in the field. In controlled lab-like conditions, they had about 400 shoppers at Quaker Bridge Mall in central New Jersey consider certain financial scenarios and tested their brain power. Then they looked at real life in the fields of India, where farmers only get paid once a year. Before the harvest, they take out loans and pawn goods. After they sell their harvest, they are flush with cash.

Mullainathan and colleagues tested the same 464 farmers before and after the harvest and their IQ scores improved by 25 percent when their wallets fattened.

"It’s a very powerful effect," said study co-author Eldar Shafir, a Princeton University psychology professor. "When you are dealing with budgetary finances, it does intrude on your thinking. It’s at the top of your mind."

In the New Jersey part of the study, the scientists tested about 400 shoppers, presenting them with scenarios that involved a large and a small car repair bill. Those with family incomes of about $20,000 scored about the same as those with $70,000 incomes on IQ tests when the car bill was small. But when the poorer people had to think about facing a whopping repair bill, their IQ scores were 40 percent lower.

Education differences can’t be a major factor because the poor only scored worse when they were faced with big bills, Safir said. The more educated rich may have learned to divide their attention, but that wouldn’t be a significant factor, he said.

The study’s authors and others say the results contradict long-standing conservative economic social and political theory that say it is individuals — not circumstances — that are the primary problem with poverty. In the case of India, it was the same people before and after, so it can’t be the person’s fault.

"For a long time we’ve been blaming the poor for their own failings," Zhao said. "We’re arguing something very different."

Poverty researcher Kathryn Edin of Harvard, who wasn’t part of the study, said the research “is a big deal that solves a critical puzzle in poverty research.”

She said poor people often have the same mainstream values about marriage and two-parent families as everyone else, but they don’t seem to act that way. This shows that it’s not their values but the situation that impairs their decision-making, she said.

___

Online:

Journal Science: http://www.sciencemag.org

(Source: pulse.me)

August 30, 2013
Gurus Natural Rubber Sandals Offer Eco-Twist On Flip-Flops

Now, for some less depressing posts…


My feet hate to be cooped up in shoes. I wear my sandals until there’s snow on the ground, and maybe even a few days after. If you too are a sandal-lover, but are tired of choosing from less-than-eco-friendly brands, I’ve got some good news.

Gurus Natural Rubber Sandals, a project currently funding on Kickstarter, aims to reincarnate 5,000-year-old ancient Indian sandal design. Made from sustainably-sourced rubber, the sandals mimic those worm by Mahatma Ghandi, and promise to biodegrade quickly when they’re too worn out to wear.

Guru Natural Rubber Sandals

Image via Guru’s Natural Rubber Sandals

Gurus are the brainchild of Prem Thomas and Joe Choorapuzha, two entrepreneurs who met while working in NYC and later found out that their families grew up on the same street almost 7,500 miles away in Kerala, India.

The footwear they’ve designed is inspired by an ancient wooden methiyedi (meth-ee-yed-ee) sandal, which some believe to be one of the first shoes ever worn by humans. According to the designers, the sandal’s traditional Indian toe post design makes Gurus more comfortable than flip-flops: no more grasping at the sandal with your toes in order to keep it stationary while moving around.

The natural rubber used to make Gurus is hand-harvested from rubber trees in a process that can continue daily for 25 years without harming the tree. This means that if and when the sandals become worn out, they will break down naturally in the landfill. In addition, the company has pledged to plant a tree for every pair sold.

Interested in slipping your foot into a pair? Pre-order via the project’s Kickstarter page.

August 30, 2013
Poverty causes constant distraction that is like losing 13 IQ points

Unfortunately, I might be experiencing this very concept at the moment. :\ This sucks. Oh, and by the by Mr. Brian Wang, your “advice for better performance” is much easier said than done; and if you’d ever been in a position of poverty yourself, you’d know better than to include your shitty bullet-pointed suggestions. Your last name serves you well. 


In a series of experiments run by researchers at Princeton, Harvard, and the University of Warwick, low-income people who were primed to think about financial problems performed poorly on a series of cognition tests, saddled with a mental load that was the equivalent of losing an entire night’s sleep. Put another way, the condition of poverty imposed a mental burden akin to losing 13 IQ points, or comparable to the cognitive difference that’s been observed between chronic alcoholics and normal adults.

Advice for better performance
- do not drink
- get a good nights sleep
- get in an undistracted mental state


What Shafir and his colleagues have identified is not exactly stress. Rather, poverty imposes something else on people that impedes them even when biological markers of stress (like elevated heart rates and blood pressure) aren’t present. Stress can also positively affect us in small quantities. An athlete under stress, for example, may actually perform better. Stress follows a kind of classic curve: a little bit can help, but beyond a certain point, too much of it will harm us.

This picture of cognitive bandwidth looks different. To study it, the researchers performed two sets of experiments. In the first, about 400 randomly chosen people in a New Jersey mall were asked how they would respond to a scenario where their car required either $150 or $1,500 in repairs. Would they pay for the work in full, take out of a loan, or put off the repair? How would they make that decision? The subjects varied in annual income from $20,000 to $70,000.

Before responding, the subjects were given a series of common tests (identifying sequences of shapes and numbers, for example) measuring cognitive function and fluid intelligence. In the easier scenario, where the hypothetical repair cost only $150, subjects classified as “poor” and “rich” performed equally well on these tests. But the “poor” subjects performed noticeably worse in the $1,500 scenario. Simply asking these people to think about financial problems taxed their mental bandwidth.

(Source: nextbigfuture.com)

August 27, 2013
madcatinc:

Space Stuff- 10x10 Digital Art Print
MelissaAnneDesigns.etsy.com

Moody as fuck! 

madcatinc:

Space Stuff- 10x10 Digital Art Print

MelissaAnneDesigns.etsy.com

Moody as fuck! 

August 27, 2013
madcatinc:

Magnetic Poetry Digital Art Print
MelissaAnneDesigns.etsy.com

Magnetic Poetry is the coolest! 

madcatinc:

Magnetic Poetry Digital Art Print

MelissaAnneDesigns.etsy.com

Magnetic Poetry is the coolest! 

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